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Winsor and Newton period colors

Page history last edited by Lynette 9 years, 5 months ago

Part of the Scribal Arts collection on art materials.

 

Winsor & Newton gouache colors identified by Ellen of the Scholars as period colors, along with their various ratings. (Information about the full line, including non-period colors, is also available.)

 

W & N Permanence ratings of A and AA are permanent enough for SCA use.

ASTM Lightfastness ratings of I and II are enduring enough for SCA use.

 

 

Color name
Color code
W & N Permanence rating
ASTM Lightfastness rating
Opacity
Cadmium yellow
108
A
I
Opaque
Cadmium red
094
A
I
Opaque
Vermilion
?
?
?
?
Permanent Alizarin Crimson
466?
A
?
Semiopaque
Ultramarine
660
A
I
Opaque
Indigo
322
A(iii) - bleached by acids
I
Opaque
Viridian
692
AA
I
Transparent
Naples yellow 422 AA I Opaque
Naples yellow (deep) 425 AA I Opaque
Yellow ochre 744 AA I Opaque
Raw umber 554 AA I Opaque
Lamp black 337 AA I Opaque
Permanent white 512 A I Opaque
Earth green ? ? ? ?
Terrvert ? ? ?  

 

Vermilion, earth green, and terrvert were handwritten additions to the period color chart that these notes were transcribed from. However, I can't find corresponding names in Winsor & Newton's current gouache lineup; they may have been discontinued?

 

Comments (2)

Anne McKinney said

at 8:13 am on Feb 28, 2011

If I remember correctly, the extra colors in my notes were mentioned as period colors that were not included in the color chart pamphlet. I'm looking in another book I read since then to confirm whether Earth Green and Terrvert are two different names for the same color. These would be period pigments and you'd need to get the pigments dry and make your own paint from them.

I'm failing to find the sources where I've found information about toxic pigments but I think vermilion traditionally contained mercury or lead. That may explain why it's not among the period pigments you can buy from this company! :-)

Bran Chandler said

at 10:15 am on Sep 9, 2014

Vermillion, also known as Chinese red, was made from cinnabar, which is mercury ore (with sulfur).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermilion
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnabar

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